For the first time, astronomers have uncovered evidence of water vapour at Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede. The latest discovery was made when astronomers re-examined Hubble observations from the last two decades.

Jupiter's moon Ganymede is said to have vast reserves of water under its crust, more than all the Earth's oceans. As new data and insights pour in about Ganymede, the European Space Agency's Juice Mission is also prepping for launch in 2022. 

     

Hubble Telescope finds evidence of water vapour in Solar System's biggest moon Ganymede

WHAT?

For the first time, astronomers have uncovered evidence of water vapour at Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede.

HOW?

The latest discovery was made when astronomers re-examined Hubble observations from the last two decades.

WHO?

Astronomers say that Ganymede's ocean could reside roughly 100 miles below the crust, therefore, the water vapour spotted in the atmosphere would not represent the evaporation of this ocean. 

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The study published in the journal Nature Astronomy states that Ganymede’s atmosphere is produced by charged particle sputtering and sublimation (the process of turning from solid to gas) of its icy surface.

As new data and insights pour in about Ganymede, the European Space Agency's Juice Mission is prepping for launch in 2022. The JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) will arrive at its destination in 2029